College of Veterinary Medicine |
Association of Shelter Veterinarians

Healthy Animals, Healthy People, Healthy Planet

Student Chapter of the Association of Shelter Veterinarians

SCASV logo

The Shelter Medicine Club is the Student Chapter of the Association of Shelter Veterinarians (http://www.sheltervet.org) (SCASV). The SCASV serves as an advocate for the profession of shelter veterinary medicine, and the Association's mission is to advance the practice of shelter medicine and to further veterinary education and research as it relates to animals' health in shelters. The Shelter Medicine Club's activities include spay and neuter wet labs, lectures with shelter veterinarians and behaviorists, and volunteer work with Whitman County Humane Society. The club assists the Cat Management Coalition, whose monthly events at Blue Mountain Humane Society are designed to help with feral cat management and to provide low-cost cat spay and neuter options in the Walla Walla area. The Shelter Medicine Club also helps to support and advocate for the Shelter Training Program at Whitman County Humane Society. This program works to socialize and train shelter pets to improve their chances for adoption into forever homes.

Pups Parading the Palouse

Pups Parading the Palouse - photos of dogs

Could your dog benefit from an organized, weekly walk? Does your dog exhibit signs of anxiety or even aggression while walking in public?

The WSU Shelter Training Program has been hosting for the last 2 years a weekly, social dog walk (Pups Parading the Palouse) for all dogs and their owners of the Pullman/Moscow Community, under the supervision of Dr. Fanucchi-Behavior Services.

Our mission is to provide a safe community for dogs and people to work together, socialize, and exercise, while representing a responsible human-dog relationship. We are accepting and supportive of all dog breeds and personalities, as well as any canine behavioral "issues" or concerns. We are dedicated to public education and advocate for dog breeds (such as Pit Bulls) that are not always welcome in public settings.

We explore the city of Pullman while working with our own dogs, shelter dogs, and guide dogs in training on leash manners, behavioral challenges, and basic socialization. Each dog is considered to be in training on these walks; therefore there is NO physical contact between dogs. This includes dogs that know each other. By doing so, we maintain an environment in which the dogs may be as calm and successful as possible.

Please visit our Facebook Page (http://www.facebook.com/pupsparadingthepalouse/) to learn more!
Washington State University