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PPP conducts research aimed at generating scientific knowledge on the human-animal bond (HAB) and its applications. PPP explores how animals can participate in the well-being of people and how the HAB influences the practice of veterinary medicine and veterinary education. PPP aims to conduct innovative research that will result in identifying, promoting and facilitating the HAB.

List of PPP�s recent works:

   
 
Martin, F. and Taunton, A. (2006). Perceived importance and integration of the human-animal bond in private veterinary practice. JAVMA, 228 (4), 522-527.

Glover, S. and Martin, F. (2006). Veterinary Students� Attitudes toward Companion Animals� Legal Status. International Society for Anthrozoology Annual Conference. Barcelona, Spain.

Martin, F. (2006). Integrating Virtual Animals in Humane Education Curricula: The Experience of the College of Veterinary Medicine at WSU. Building Just, Diverse and Democratic Communities. Society for the Study of Social Problems 56th Annual Meeting. Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

Martin, F.  and Taunton, A. E. (2006). Human-Animal Bond, Veterinary Practice and Veterinary Education: Contradictory Input from Practitioners in the State of Washington. 143rd AVMA Annual Convention. Honolulu, Hawaii, USA.

Martin, F. (2005). When the Human-Animal Bond Meets Technology: People-Pet Partnership Online Curriculum. 59th Annual NAE4-HA Conference. Seattle, WA, USA.

Coultis, D. and Martin, F. (2005). Integrating the Human-Animal Bond in Veterinary Medicine: The People-Pet Partnership Model. Symposium on the Relationship between Humans and Animals. Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kitasoto University, Japan.

Glover, S., Martin, F. and Taunton, A. E. (2005). Human-Animal Bond: Implications for the Practice of Veterinary Medicine as Reflected in Perceptions of Practitioners, Owners� Expectations and the Law. International Society for Anthrozoology Annual Conference. Niagara, NY. USA.

Martin, F. and Taunton, A. E. (2005). Introducing humane education though technology and virtual animals. International Society for Anthrozoology Annual Conference. Niagara, NY. USA.

Martin, F. and Taunton, A. E. (2005). Perceptions on Human-Animal Bond (HAB) education and the role of the HAB in private practice by veterinarians in Washington state. International Society for Anthrozoology Annual Conference. Niagara, NY. USA.

Martin, F. and Taunton, A. (2005). Perceptions of the human-animal bond in veterinary education by veterinarians in Washington state: Structured versus experiential learning. JVME, 32 (4), 523-530.

Martin, F., Taunton, A., and Paznokas, L. (2005). Who let the dog in?  Virtual animals as science teaching assistants. CESI Science, 38 (2), 22-27.

Martin, F., Ruby, K. L., Deking, T. M., and Taunton, A. E. (2004). Factors associated with client, staff, and student satisfaction regarding small animal euthanasia procedures at a veterinary teaching hospital. Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 224(11), 1774-1779.

Martin, F. (2004). Improving Reading, Math, Language, and Science Proficiency Using Virtual Animals in the Classroom. National Science Teachers Association Northwestern Convention. Seattle, USA.

Martin, F., Ruby, K. L., and Taunton, A. E. (2004). When the bond is broken: Companion animal owners and staff of a veterinary teaching hospital share their experiences about euthanasia. 10th International Conference on Human-Animal Interactions. Glasgow, Scotland.

Martin, F. (2003). Using Virtual Animals in the Classroom to Teach Children About the Humane Treatment of Animals. Washington Science Teachers� Association 2003 Annual Conference. Pullman, USA.

Martin, F., Ruby, K, and Farnum, J. (2003). Importance of the Human-Animal Bond for Pre-Veterinary, First, and Fourth Year Veterinary Students in Relation to Their Career Choice. Journal of Veterinary Medical Education, 30(1), 67-72.

Martin, F. and Farnum, J. (2002). Animal-Assisted Therapy for Children with Pervasive Developmental Disorder. Western Journal of Nursing Research, 24(5), 657-670.

Martin, F. and Farnum, J. (2002). Animal-Assisted Therapy May Promote Social Interactions in Children with Pervasive Developmental Disorder. 11th International Society for Comparative Psychology. Chicago, USA.

Martin, F. and Farnum, J. (2002). Kids and Canines: Can AAT Help Children with Pervasive Developmental Disorder? Delta Society 2002 Annual Conference. Seattle, USA.

Martin, F, Farnum, J., and Morse, K. (2001). Effects of Animal-Assisted Therapy on Expression of Pro-Social Behaviors in Children with PDD. 9th International Conference on Human-Animal Interactions. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

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