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in the media

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In the Media

Articles about the college from around the world.


  • Bacteria use traffic-cop-like mechanism to infect gut

    A study has found that a cellular syringe-like device used to invade intestinal cells also acts as a traffic cop – directing bacteria where to go and thereby enabling them to efficiently carry out infection.
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  • Undergraduate Advisor Dr. Samantha Gizerian Receives National Advising Award

    Neuroscience undergraduate advisor, Dr. Samantha Gizerian, has received the Outstanding Advising Award in the Faculty Advising category from the National Academic Advising Association. This is a national award and an immense honor. Congratulations to Dr. Gizerian! 


  • IPN's Dr. Cynthia Faux Receives WSU Libraries' Excellence Award

    Dr. Cynthia Faux, a clinical assistant professor in IPN, will receive the Libraries' Excellence Award on May 5th. To read more about this award, view the WSU News story: May 5: Faux to receive WSU Libraries’ Excellence Award


  • PrIMe researcher receives grant to improve safety of pain medications for cats

    Cats are the most common pet in the United States. Every year, thousands of cats unnecessarily suffer from pain and inflammation when they could have benefitted from treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as meloxicam.  This is because relative to most dogs and humans, cats are more likely to experience serious side effects from NSAIDs, limiting safe and effective inflammation and pain control in this species. Understanding the effects of NSAIDs on cellular metabolism in cats will help unveil the mechanism underlying their predisposition to serious side effects relative to other species and open the way to substantial advances in the treatment of inflammation and pain in these animals. In this study we will determine the effects of chronic meloxicam administration on cellular metabolite profiles in cat plasma and urine. We will apply an untargeted metabolomics approach that will allow us to identify currently unknown metabolite changes that could explain why cats are predisposed to adverse effects of the NSAID meloxicam.
  • Several Neuroscience Undergraduates Awarded Office of Undergraduate Education Awards

    Congratulations to the neuroscience undergraduates that received awards at the Office of Undergraduate Education Awards Ceremony:

    International Tutor Training Program Certification:
    Samantha Gottlieb

    Harold and Jeanne Rounds Olsen Award for Undergraduate Excellence in Writing:
    Jennifer Glover
    Halle Weimar

    SURCA Honorable Mention:
    Angela Rocchi
    Halle Weimar


  • Successful Ph.D. Defense: Megan Slaker

    Congratulations to Megan Slaker for her successful Ph.D. thesis defense entitled "Caught in the net: Perineuronal nets and cocaine memory". 


  • 2016 Poster Session and Scholarship Event Awards 3 Neuroscience Scholarships

    Congratulations to the 2016 Neuroscience scholarship awardees:
    Jennifer Glover
    Nicholas Greene
    Halle Weimar

    View the photos from the poster session here: 2016 Poster Session


  • Genome scientist earns top award for innovative research

    Kelley-J-2013-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Joanna Kelley, genome scientist and assistant professor in the School of Biological Sciences, is the inaugural winner of the international Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution’s “Junior Award for Independent Research.”

    The award singles out outstanding independent researchers demonstrating innovative, creative work “that is moving the field of molecular biology and evolution forward,” according to the society website. The annual award includes recognition at the annual banquet in July, a cash prize of $2,000 and a travel award to attend the annual meeting.

    Kelley’s lab at Washington State University focuses on high-throughput genome sequencing and computational approaches to analyzing big data in genomics.

    Earlier this year, she found the genetic mechanism that lets a fish live in toxic, sulfidic water, opening new insights into the functioning of other “extremophiles” and how they adapt to their challenging environments. In 2014, she sequenced the DNA of the Antarctic midge and assembled the smallest insect genome to date. The year before, GenomeWeb named her one of its top 20 young investigators.

  • Rabies Just Can’t Get Any Respect

    What does a killer disease have to do to get attention these days? Last year, people watched with horror as Ebola ravaged West Africa and spread fear around the globe. Now it’s the turn of the upstart Zika virus to grab the headlines as an international health emergency.

    Meanwhile, I’ve just been quietly doing my thing, killing about 60,000 people per year in the most gruesome way imaginable. But hey, I’m just rabies — nothing to get worked up over, right?

    Read more on TheHuffingtonPost.com Read More
  • Rabies Just Can’t Get Any Respect

    mwangi-samuel

    What does a killer disease have to do to get attention these days? Last year, people watched with horror as Ebola ravaged West Africa and spread fear around the globe. Now it’s the turn of the upstart Zika virus to grab the headlines as an international health emergency.

    Meanwhile, I’ve just been quietly doing my thing, killing about 60,000 people per year in the most gruesome way imaginable. But hey, I’m just rabies — nothing to get worked up over, right?

    Read more on TheHuffingtonPost.com Read More
  • Neuroscience Graduate Student Axel Fenwick Receives NSF Honorable Mention

    Neuroscience graduate student Axel Fenwick has received an honorable mention from the National Science Foundation for the Intellectual Merit and Broader Impacts of his proposed work. Congratulations! 


  • Neuroscience Undergraduate Angela Rocchi for Goldwater Honorable Mention

    Congratulations to undergraduate Neuroscience student Angela Rocchi for receiving the Goldwater Honorable Mention award! 


  • Congratulations to Neuroscience SURCA Winners!

    Congratulations to the Neuroscience SURCA Winners! 

    In the ORGANISMAL, POPULATION, ECOLOGICAL, AND EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY category:

    Chloe Erikson and mentor Brendan Walker, Gray Award

    In the SOCIAL SCIENCES category:
    Darian Sidebottom and mentor Cristina Wilson, Gray Award

    In the MOLECULAR, CELLULAR, AND CHEMICAL BIOLOGY category:
    Brittany Cole and mentor Mike Varnum, Crimson Award
    Forrest Shaffer and mentor Jim Peters, Gray Award
    Julianna Brutman and mentor Jon Davis, Gray Award


  • Congratulations to Ryan Summers on winning the Goldwater Scholarship award and to Keesha Matz and Angela Rocchi on receiving Goldwater Honorable Mention awards.

    Congratulations to Ryan Summers on winning the Goldwater Scholarship award and to Keesha Matz and Angela Rocchi on receiving Goldwater Honorable Mention awards.
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  • AKC awards $150,000 to PrIMe laboratory for Sighthound genetic research

    The American Kennel Club (AKC) has awarded $150,000 to Dr. Michael H. Court BVSc, PhD (principal investigator) and Dr. Stephanie Martinez, PhD. (postdoctoral fellow) to study adverse drug reactions in greyhounds and related sighthound dog breeds.   The project entitled “Understanding the Genetics of Adverse Drug Reactions in Sighthounds” (AKC grant #02242) will determine the effect of several genetic mutations on drug metabolism enzyme function using cell-based model systems.  These mutations were discovered in a targeted genetic screen of greyhound DNA and may explain why some greyhounds wake up slowly from a number of anesthetic drugs.  Importantly, other sighthound dog breeds such as Scottish deerhounds and non-sighthound breeds such as border collies have this mutation.  The ultimate goal is to develop a genetic test that could identify dogs at risk that will require different drugs or drug dosages. AKC Canine Health Foundation
  • Neuroscience Gradaute Student Phillip Uribe Wins 3MT Contest

    Congratulations to Neuroscience graduate student Phillip Uribe for winning the 3-Minute Thesis (3MT) contest! His award includes a $3,000 travel grant to a conference of his choice. Read the article in the WSU News here: Engaging research summary wins Three Minute Thesis 


  • Dr. James Peters Receives Student Technology Fee Committee Request for Funding

    IPN’s Dr. James Peters has been granted funding from the Student Technology Fee Committee resulting from his presentation: Competitive Upgrade to Undergraduate Neuroscience/Physiology Program Equipment, the goal of which is to provide a digital dissecting microscope and to expand lab capacity with a recording system in McCoy 201N. The request will result in the Student Technology Fee Committee recommending an allocation of $54,500 to the Board of Regents at their next meeting. 


  • WSU grant will help fight devastating citrus disease

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  • Graduate Student Megan Slaker Received GPSA Award of Excellence

    Neuroscience graduate student Megan Slaker was awarded the GPSA Excellence award for her contribution as a Research Assistant in Fall 2015. 


  • Program aims to eradicate human rabies by 2030

    Washington State University is playing a vital role in the World Health Organization’s effort to eradicate human rabies from the planet by 2030.
    Read More at SeattleTimes.com

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