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in the media

Healthy Animals, Healthy People, Healthy Planet

In the Media

Articles about the college from around the world.


  • Solving world hunger, one cow at a time

    SMB Professor and Director of the Center for Reproductive Biology Dr. Jon Oatley was recently featured in the Moscow-Pullman Daily News.  Dr. Oatley’s efforts to boost food production through genetic manipulation of cattle breeding strains is basic research addressing a global challenge.

    Moscow-Pullman Daily News
  • Washington rabbit owners - be aware of deadly rabbit virus reported in British Columbia

    Read More
  • Washington State Cougars of the Desert fund scholarships

    What began 31 years ago as a casual social of "Coug" friends in the desert each winter has blossomed into a major fundraiser to support scholarships for students at WSU.  Over this time, there has been a significant increase in attendance and participation.

    The weekend includes a luncheon, silent auction and keynote speaker on Saturday and a Golf Classic and dinner culminating with a live auction on Sunday evening.  This year’s event at Desert Falls Country Club in Palm Desert saw the highest number of attendees with 145 at Saturday’s luncheon. On Sunday, approximately 80 golfers participated in the Golf Classic with an additional 40 attending the evening dinner and live auction. 
    Read More Desert Sun
  • Pursuing sustainable, creative living

    Billie Weston didn't plan to end up working in a print shop, but she loves it. Moscow Pullman Daily News
  • WSU ranked number one in USDA research, development expenditures

    Washington State University tops the list of U.S. Department of Agriculture research and development expenditures, according to the most recent figures available. WSU News Office of Research
  • These are the star qualities that landed us our jobs

    The workplace in Kenya, and indeed all over the world, is getting younger and younger, as it is, millennials constitute a significant fraction of the workforce in most organisations. Some industries such as broadcast media and tech firms have been quick to tap into this young talent, energy and elasticity, and even entrusted them with central roles.

    International auditing firm PwC, had aimed for an 80 per cent composition of youth in its personnel globally by 2016. Though conservative companies have been slower to engage the youth in focal roles, generally, the tide of a more youthful workforce is fast rising. 
    Read More Daily Nation
  • SMB Tenure/Promotion Dr. Jon Oatley, Dr. Rey Carabeo, and Dr. Mary Sanchez-Lanier

    CONGRATULATIONS! Three SMB faculty members have been awarded tenure or promoted, effective July 1, 2018. Please join us in congratulating:

    ·        Dr Jon Oatley has been promoted to full professor

    ·        Dr. Rey Carabeo has been granted tenure (at his current rank of associate professor)

    ·        Dr. Mary Sanchez-Lanier has been promoted to full professor in the non-tenured, clinical track.

  • New facilities to meet animal research requirements

    Daily Evergreen
  • IPN Faculty Promotions: Drs. James Peters, Rita Fuchs Lokensgard, Alli Coffin

    Dr. James Peters has been promoted to Associate Professor with tenure; Dr. Alli Coffin has been promoted to Associate Professor with tenure; and Dr. Rita Fuchs Lokensgard has been promoted to Full Professor. 
  • WSU ELK HOOF DISEASE RESEARCH CANDIDATE SPEAKS AT SPCC March 8

    CONTACT: Charlie Powell, 509-335-7073 or charlie_powell@wsu.edu

    Elk HerdPULLMAN, Wash - Washington State University is bringing the second of four candidates for a new position as elk hoof disease research leader to Olympia for a public presentation on Thursday, Mar. 8.

    The presentation is set for 9 a.m. in the South Puget Sound Community College Lecture Hall, Room 105, 2011 Mottman Rd. SW, in Olympia. The Lecture Hall building is designated as #26 on the SPCC Olympia Campus map that shows limited parking availability.

    The map is available at https://spscc.edu/sites/default/files/imce/about/maps/SPSCC-Campus-Map.pdf .

    The candidate, Todd O'Hara, is currently a professor of veterinary pharmacology/toxicology and wildlife disease at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. He earned a doctorate in pharmacology/toxicology from The Medical College of Virginia in 1988 and a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree from the University of Wisconsin in 1992. Dr. O'Hara currently is the principle investigator at the Wildlife Toxicology Laboratory.

    Dr. O'Hara's talk is entitled, "Elk Hoof Disease: Integrating Academic and Agency Investigations." Following his presentation, there will be time for a public question and answer period as well as an opportunity to speak with the candidate.

    In 2017, the Washington legislature passed and funded legislation designating WSU's College of Veterinary Medicine as the lead organization for finding potential solutions for elk hoof disease. The disease can cause profound lameness, sloughing of the hooves, and eventually death of affected animals. Nearly $1.52 million was provided to the college for establishing the new program.

    The research program will involve collaboration with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), the Washington Department of Agriculture, Native American tribes and other national and international agencies that can lend expertise and field activities relative to elk ecology and well-being..

  • American Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians

     Life Membership Award: Dr. Terry McElwain, Oak Harbor, Washington. Dr. McElwain earned his DVM degree from Kansas State University in 1980 and his doctorate in infectious diseases and immunology from Washington State University in 1986. A diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Pathologists, he is regents professor emeritus in the Paul G. Allen School for Global Animal Health at Washington State University.
    Read More American Veterinary Medical Association
  • Andrew I. Moe ('54 DVM) - February 19, 2018



    Andrew I. Moe ('54 DVM) - February 19, 2018

    Andrew I. Moe, 91, passed away peacefully on February 19, 2018 after a long illness.
    Andrew was born in Tacoma, WA to Ole and Ingeborg Moe. He was the youngest in his family with four brothers and three sisters. He was married for 51 years to the “personification of young womanhood,” his lovely wife Dorothy Moe. He is survived by his well-loved children, Sylvia McGowan (Gene), Pam Barker (Neill), and Joyce Moe (Martha); grandchildren, Pam, Josh, Lindsey, Sam, Andrew, Loralyn, James, Brittany, Melissa, and Carolyn; great-grandchildren, Ben, Jackson, Samson, and Lucy; brother-in-law William Becker (Christine); and many nieces, nephews, and cousins.

    After completing undergraduate degrees at College of Puget Sound in Tacoma, Andrew earned his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree from Washington State College in Pullman. Andrew was a Regulatory Veterinarian for the State of California for 33 years. His work included eradicating brucellosis in cattle in California. He was also on the task force that eliminated Avian Influenza from Southern California in the 1970s. He was a member of the No. San Joaquin Vet Med Assn (Pres 1979) and a Charter Member of the Calif Vet Medical Assn.

    Service to his country, his community, and his family was a core value for Andrew. He served in the Air Force on active duty from 1954-1956 and in the Air Force Reserves for 28 years, attaining the rank of Lt. Colonel. He was called to active duty during the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962 and would have been the commanding officer of a MASH hospital to arrive on the seventh plane, if forces were deployed into Cuba. He was a VFW Life Member (Commander Post 4144/1998-2001, Quartermaster 2000-02, Trustee Post 3199/2004-05), a Charter Member of the Military Officers Assn, and a Life Member of the following organizations: American Legion, Reserve Officers Assn, Retired Officers Assn, and Assn of Military Surgeons US.

    Andrew was also a member of The Shriners (Bd Dirs Modesto 1995), Masons (Illustrious Master Modesto Chpt 1983, Allied Masonic Degrees Pres 1991, Man of Yr Award 1999), York Rite, and Scottish Rite (Pres Central Valley 1997, Bd Dirs 1998-2004). He served as “Rainbow Dad” and a board member for the International Order of the Rainbow for Girls (Grand Cross of Color). He chaperoned dances and drove carloads of Rainbow Girls to many events. He was also a member of the Sons of Norway, and the Modesto Elks Lodge 1282. He was a member of Calvary Lutheran Church for over 50 years and served in several roles there.

    Andrew touted himself as a “Man of Moderate Means with a Few Non-Problems.” In his retirement, he enjoyed having coffee with friends at the Brenda Athletic Club and a glass or two of wine at VFW 3199 or at the Elks Lodge. He had a very analytical mind and could fix or build anything around the house. Andrew was a mentor and very influential to numerous people during his lifetime through his willingness to help those in need. He had a knack for encouraging others and could put a positive spin on almost any situation. His honesty, integrity, and respect for others proved a role model for everyone who knew him.

    Andrew will be honored with a military ceremony at San Joaquin Valley National Cemetery in Santa Nella on Tuesday, February 27th at 11:30AM, and with a Memorial Service at Franklin and Downs McHenry Chapel on Saturday, March 17th at 11:00AM. Donations can be made to the charity of your choice mentioning Andrew’s name.

    www.cvobituaries.com

  • Canine influenza has not made it to the Palouse

    Moscow-Pullman Daily News
  • Seattle Humane’s new facility houses more animals, cleaner environment

    Issaquah | Sammamish Reporter
  • Dog food recall worries residents, but so far no harm to pets in Spokane

    The Spokesman-Review
  • Dr. Mike Corcoran, Presidential Service Award, American Association of Fish Veterinarians

    Mike CorcoranDr. Mike Corcoran, Presidential Service Award, American Association of Fish Veterinarians - Mike Corcoran, DVM

    JAVMA News
  • William E. Babcock ('45 DVM) - October 17, 2017

    William Edward Babcock

    William E. Babcock ('45 DVM) - October 17, 2017

    William Edward Babcock, age 95, died at home in Terre Haute, Indiana. A native of Buhl, Idaho, Bill was born October 15, 1922, son of Everett E. Babcock and Ona Zbinden Babcock. 

    Bill graduated from Buhl High School in 1940. He attended Washington State University in Pullman, WA where he was a member of the Army Student Training Program and graduated with a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine in May 1945. While at Washington State Bill met the love of his life, Nina Virginia March. They were married January 26, 1945. 
    In May 1945, Bill and Nina moved to Corvallis, Oregon where Bill took a position at Oregon State University in the Poultry Disease lab. Following his research appointment, they moved to Buhl, Idaho where Bill opened a veterinary practice in his parents’ home. Bill enlisted in the US Army in August 1946 and served in the Veterinary Corps. He was posted to Fort Riley, Kansas where he cared for the horses in the last active cavalry unit of the US Army. His military service was completed in 1948 as a Captain. In the Spring of 1949, the Babcocks returned to Corvallis where Bill assumed the position of Associate Professor at OSU. In 1963, the family moved to Terre Haute, Indiana and Bill began his career with Pfizer Animal Health. He retired in 1988 as Director of Animal Health Research. Bill and Nina lived a full and happy life together. They loved to dance, ski, and travel with friends and family and were long time members of The Country Club of Terre Haute. 

    He leaves to cherish his memory Nina Virginia Babcock, his loving wife of 72 years, devoted children Robert E. Babcock (Rebecca) Port Lavaca, TX, Virginia A. Ware (Douglas) Chapel Hill, NC, Lora B. Mail (Rodney) Indianapolis, IN and Thomas W. Babcock (Deborah) Fair Haven, NJ. Also surviving are 13 grandchildren Jeffery Babcock (Traci), Allison Babcock (David Nagle), Kara Shane (Robert) and Jay Babcock (Stacy), Anna Marie Ware and Kristin Ware, Anne Mail, Ellen Mail, and Clare Mail (Michael Rardon), William Babcock (Katherine), Sarah Babcock, Ann Babcock and Thomas Babcock. In addition, there are four great grandchildren, Dimitri Babcock, Braxton Nagle, Parker Nagle and Robert Shane. Bill was predeceased by his parents Everett E. Babcock and Ona Zbinden Babcock and brother Donald Babcock. 

    The family is grateful the for the home care aides whose compassionate care allowed the fulfillment of his wishes to remain at home. 

    A true gentleman, honest and humble with a twinkle in his eyes, Bill is fondly remembered for his love of family and friends. 

  • WSU Elk Hoof Disease Research Candidate Speaks at SPCC February 22

    CONTACT: Charlie Powell, 509-335-7073 or charlie_powell@wsu.edu

    Elk HerdPULLMAN, Wash - Washington State University is bringing the first of at least four candidates for a new position as elk hoof disease research leader to Olympia for a public presentation on Thursday, Feb. 22.

    The presentation is set for 9 a.m. in the South Puget Sound Community College Lecture Hall 2011 Mottman Rd. SW, in Olympia.  The Lecture Hall building is designated as #26 on the SPCC Olympia Campus map which also shows parking availability which is limited. 

    The map is available at https://spscc.edu/sites/default/files/imce/about/maps/SPSCC-Campus-Map.pdf .

    The candidate, Aniruddha Belsare, is currently a post-doctoral fellow in the University of Idaho’s Center for Modeling and Complex Interactions.  He earned his Ph.D. in Wildlife Sciences with a focus on Disease Ecology from the University of Missouri in 2013.  His current research has focused on the interaction between disease causing organisms and the animals they infect.

    Dr. Belsare’s lecture is entitled, “Pragmatic models for defensible decisions: An adaptive management approach for mitigating wildlife disease threats.”  Following his presentation, there will be time for a public question and answer period as well as an opportunity to speak with the candidate.

    In 2017, the Washington legislature passed and funded legislation designating WSU’s College of Veterinary Medicine as the lead organization for finding potential solutions for elk hoof disease.  The disease can cause profound lameness, sloughing of the hooves, and eventually death of affected animals. Nearly $1.52 million was provided to the college for establishing the new program.

    The research program will involve collaboration with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), the Washington Department of Agriculture, Native American tribes and other national and international agencies that can lend expertise and field activities relative to elk ecology and well-being.

  • Daniel Leonard DeWeert ('78 DVM) - September 12, 2017



    Daniel Leonard DeWeert ('78 DVM) - September 12, 2017

    Dr. Daniel Leonard DeWeert, age 69, of Twisp, passed away at the VA Hospital of Puget Sound on Sept. 12, 2017. He was born on Jan. 31, 1948, to Ray and Mary-Jo DeWeert in Kelso, Washington.

    Dan was raised in Kelso, and graduated from Kelso High School in 1966. He then served as a veterinary technician in the U.S. Air Force.

    Dan graduated from The Washington State University School of Veterinary Medicine in 1978. He worked as an associate veterinarian in Brewster, before starting Valley Veterinary Clinic in Twisp later that year. He specialized in equine medicine and small animal orthopedics.

    Dan was involved in the Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) at both the state and national level for many years. He served as president of the Washington State Veterinary Medical Association (WSVMA) from 1986-1987. After serving as president, Dan served as a delegate for the WSVMA and AVMA House of Delegates for 10 years. During his last three years in the House, Dan was a member of the House Advisory Committee representing Equine Medicine. Only seven veterinarians from the United States are asked to serve on this committee at any one time.

    Dan was honored by the recognitions that he received while serving his profession. In 1987, WSU presented Dan with an Outstanding Leadership Award in the WSVMA. In 1991, the AVMA recognized Dan and longtime friend, Dr. Gary Duskin, for their roles as co-chairmen for the AVMA convention in Seattle, and, in 2011, Dan was the recipient of the WSVMA Veterinary of the Year award.

    Locally, Dan provided veterinary services to the annual rodeos and Omak Suicide race — providing support of local heritage. Dan made a clinic policy of keeping the doors open for students interested in pursuing a career in veterinary medicine. This culminated in nine students who went on to become veterinarians and six who became veterinary technicians. Dr. Dan was very proud of his professional accomplishments, as well as being able to serve both the local and national veterinary communities.

    After practicing veterinary medicine for 38 years, Dan retired in the fall of 2015. He enjoyed his additional time with family and friends, and frequented the vet clinic regularly to lend advice and visit with clients. An avid sports fan, Dan loved the Seattle Mariners and Seattle Seahawks, and was fiercely loyal to the Washington State Cougar football team, where he played college football himself for one year before having to step down due to injury.

    Dan was always proud of living and raising his family in the Methow Valley, and being an active member of his community gave him a great sense of self-worth. He coached football at Liberty Bell Junior-Senior High School for nine years, and loved to reminisce about the years he spent there “torturing the boys.” He also assisted with AAU basketball, coached and umpired Little League baseball, and served in the Kiwanis and Community Accountability Board. When he wasn’t chasing around his family or serving the community, Dan was at home in the outdoors. During the summer months, you could find him with his family and friends on horseback, chasing cows, or exploring the many trails around the Methow Valley. In the fall, he could be found looking for any deer that had horns.

    Dan was devoted to his profession and family, and was well known for sharing his stories with those who would listen. The stories he shared gave all of us a glimpse into the life of a man who was deeply ingrained into the soul of his community and family. Whether diving into the many stories of animals he’d saved, or how proud he was of his family — some of us may remember hearing about his grandson Marquis’s football exploits — Dan was quick to share a smile, and would always take the time to ask about someone’s family, to see how everyone was doing.

    Dan is survived by his wife, Terri; his four sisters, Rose, Patti, Cindi and Carol; his two daughters, Kellie and Sara; his two step-sons, Doug and Ryan; and his three grandchildren, Marquis, Desmond and Arya.

    He was preceded in death by his parents, Ray and Mary-Josephine, and his brother Art.

    Doctor, husband, father, grandfather and friend. Dan was a man who lived larger than life, and shared his big heart with everyone he could. He will be dearly missed, and fondly remembered. Go Cougs!

    A graveside service with military honors will be held Friday (Sept. 22) at noon in the Beaver Creek Cemetery, Twisp.

    A celebration of Dan’s Life is to follow service at the Pipestone Canyon Ranch Event Center, 448 Balky Hill Road, Twisp. Please bring your favorite dish for a potluck and pig roast. Precht-Harrison-Nearents Chapel of Okanogan is caring for the arrangements.

    Published in the Methow Valley News on Sept. 21, 2017.
  • Dr. Sue Ritter Awarded NIH Research Grant

    Dr. Sue Ritter has been awarded an NIH grant entitled "Catecholamine Neurons and Metabolic Controls". This award is $1,807,944 over the span of four years. 
Washington State University