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theia

Healthy Animals, Healthy People, Healthy Planet

Theia, a 1-year-old bully breed mix

Theia
Sara Mellado of Moses Lake reunites with Theia – a stray, injured dog she took in and named – at WSU’s Veterinary Teaching Hospital. (Photos by Linda Weiford, WSU News)



Theia's Update 4/22/2015

Apr 22, 2015, 15:06 PM by Richard B. Link

Theia went to surgery this morning at 9:30 a.m.  Endoscopy of her sinuses on the side that had been crushed showed only a narrow passage, the diameter of perhaps a pencil lead, remaining.  A guide wire was passed through the opening and an inflatable catheter was threaded onto the wire.  When the catheter was inflated, it tore some of the scar tissue and opened the area.  Next a laser wand was inserted and scar tissue was ablated before surgeons took final measurements for a custom nasal stent to be installed later this week.  Surgery took almost three hours.

She is resting comfortably this afternoon and breathing a little… through her nose again.



Washington State University veterinary surgeon, Dr. Boel Fransson, holds a 3D model of the area of Theia’s skull against the dog as she is under general anesthesia.
Washington State University veterinary surgeon, Dr. Boel Fransson, holds a 3D model of the area of Theia’s skull against the dog as she is under general anesthesia.  Theia’s sinuses were crushed by blows to the head in a failed attempt by someone to euthanize her.

A 3D printed model of the area of Theia’s skull that suffered severe fractures.
A 3D printed model of the area of Theia’s skull that suffered severe fractures.

Veterinary internal medicine specialist Dr. Rance Sellon passes a flexible endoscope into Theia’s mouth to locate the point at which her sinuses normally drain into her throat.
Veterinary internal medicine specialist Dr. Rance Sellon passes a flexible endoscope into Theia’s mouth to locate the point at which her sinuses normally drain into her throat.

Endoscopic localization of Theia’s injured sinuses reveled an opening limited to the diameter of a pencil lead.  A blue colored coated guide wire shows the tight opening on the monitor.

Endoscopic localization of Theia’s injured sinuses reveled an opening limited to the diameter of a pencil lead.  A blue colored coated guide wire shows the tight opening on the monitor.

A fine wire protrudes from Theia’s nose (shown by arrows) moments before the WSU veterinary surgeon Dr. Boel Fransson puts slides inflatable catheter over it and guides it to the site of the sinus blockage.
A fine wire protrudes from Theia’s nose (shown by arrows) moments before the WSU veterinary surgeon Dr. Boel Fransson puts slides inflatable catheter over it and guides it to the site of the sinus blockage. 

WSU veterinary surgeon Dr. Boel Fransson tests the inflatable catheter before placing it in Theia’s sinuses to open the blockage.
WSU veterinary surgeon Dr. Boel Fransson tests the inflatable catheter before placing it in Theia’s sinuses to open the blockage.

Radiographs taken in surgery at Washington State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine

Radiographs taken in surgery at Washington State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine show a candy cane-shaped flexible endoscopy in Theia’s mouth and at the point where her sinuses naturally drain into her throat.  A fine guide wire has been passed through her nose to meet the endoscope and an inflatable catheter has been threaded over it.  On the right-hand monitor, arrows show the constriction in Theia’s nasal passage that prevented her from breathing properly.  It was later opened with a medical laser.

WSU’s veterinary surgery team watches as Dr. Boel Fransson begins to pass a rigid endoscope into Theia’s nose to localize the blockage and use a medical laser to develop a patent airway again.
WSU’s veterinary surgery team watches as Dr. Boel Fransson begins to pass a rigid endoscope into Theia’s nose to localize the blockage and use a medical laser to develop a patent airway again.

A video monitor shows the view from within Theia’s sinus where a clear fiber optic laser ablation wand is being used to cut tissue and open the airway.
A video monitor shows the view from within Theia’s sinus where a clear fiber optic laser ablation wand is being used to cut tissue and open the airway.

The WSU veterinary surgical team watches a video monitor while wearing protective eyewear while a medical laser is in use to open Theia’s sinuses.
The WSU veterinary surgical team watches a video monitor while wearing protective eyewear while a medical laser is in use to open Theia’s sinuses.
Washington State University