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  Fuji

Fuji, was a beautiful Blue Roan English Cocker Spaniel. He left us September 1, 2005. He was 12 and a half years old. He was my best friend, my shadow, my confidant, my loyal friend. I miss him terribly. My house is so empty without him. My daughter still keeps me busy but its not the same. I miss his kisses, his constant whining, his cute way he laid on our bed among all the big pillows.

We got Fuji when my husband & I first got married, in May of 1993. His breeder had been breeding English Cockers for years and hand picked whom took home her puppies. After meeting us, she chose Fuji for us. He was high spirited, always getting into mischief, and stayed that way his whole life. He was great with kids, and everyone that came to our door. Wagging his little tale, and kissing as soon as he could, his bark was just to keep strangers away.
 

   
Fuji
  Fuji ended up being my dog. He loved long walks, car rides, ears flapping in the wind, cuddling next to me at night, and his treats. Whining began at 7pm every night until 10. Each time he got a treat, 10 minutes later it started again for the next one. I spoiled him and gave him 4, sometimes more. His passion for mischief was basically in food, like leaps upon the kitchen table, just to share what we were eating, or a trip into a garbage can. Many dinner he lived in his crate. He had an ambition to eat what was on the kitchen counter, and how he got to it was really a mystery, as it was against the wall and he wasn't very tall. An array of frozen strip steaks, and a 2 pound salami, made for some interesting and very expensive trips to the vet. They loved the one when he opened a piece of my husband's luggage in it's zipper compartment and ate a whole bag of chocolate covered raisins!

On December 30th, 2002, Fuji was diagnosed with Anal Sac Carcinoma. It is the rarest, and the highest malignant form of cancer a dog can get. We caught it at an early stage, while his tumor was the size of a finger tip. I took him to an animal oncologist and she tested him and the cancer had not metastasized. She suggest chemo, which could only possibly work at a rate of 30%. I chose for quality of life, not quantity. The pathology report said he had a year at best, maybe 18 months. I had a positive attitude and prayed a lot. I gave him antioxidant vitamins loaded with selenium, and my buddy persevered. He showed no signs of anything was wrong, until 5 days before I had to put him down. Which was nearly 3 years from his original diagnosis. He suddenly stopped eating, and for Fuji that was not right. I had him checked out and the cancer had spread. He went so quickly.

The morning I had to put him down was the most excruciating experience I have ever had. He was so weak, I knew he couldn't suffer anymore. Kissing him good-bye, both my husband and myself were in tears. But he let me know it was time to let him go, and I listened.

Now he lays at Arrowwood Pet Cemetery. Soon I will order his marker. It's so hard to tally up what he meant to me in a "4 word Phrase," as you can see.
I will miss him, and love him forever.

Goodnight sweet Fuji

Mommy, Daddy, Tedi, and Elliot the cat
 
 
 
Posted Oct. 5, 2005  |     Printer Friendly Version

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