Recognition Awards

Zoetis Award for Research Excellence


The Zoetis Animal Health Award for Research Excellence, established in 1985 is given to those faculty members who, through their dedication and investigation in research, are chosen from among their peers as an outstanding researcher in the field of veterinary medicine.

Dr. Santanu Bose in a lab

2020

Santanu BoseProfessor, Veterinary Microbiology and Pathology

Zoetis John Wyrick 2018

2018

Dr. John Wyrick, (center) received the 2018 Zoetis Research Excellence Award.

Anthony Nicola Zoetis Award

2017

Dean Bryan Slinker (left) presented the 2017 Zoetis Research Excellence Award to Dr. Anthony Nicola

Dr. Bill Sischo

2016

The recipient of the Zoetis Award for Veterinary Research Excellence for 2016 was Dr. Bill Sischo, Professor in the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences. Dr. Sischo was recognized for his longstanding efforts directed at understanding the ecology of zoonotic and foodborne pathogens in animal production units with a particular focus on dairy beef and milk production. Dr. Sischo gave a presentation highlighting his research accomplishments to top off the evening.

The award was presented by Dr. Rocky Bigbie of Zoetis (right), and Dean Bryan Slinker (left).

Court

2015

Dr. Robert Mealey, Associate Dean for Research (right) presented the 2015 Zoetis Research Excellence Award to Dr. Michael Court, Professor and William R. Jones Endowed Chair in the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences. Dr. Court was recognized for his longstanding and ground-breaking research in veterinary pharmacogenomics, which includes his discovery of the mechanism of acetaminophen toxicity in cats.

Dr. Patricia Hunt

2014

Dean Bryan Slinker (left) and Dr. Rocky Bigbie, DVM from Zoetis (right) presented the 2014 Zoetis Research Excellence Award to Patricia Hunt, professor in the School of Molecular Biosciences. Dr. Hunt received the award for her ongoing research determining the reproductive effects of exposure to chemicals with estrogenic activity during different developmental time points.

img8E

2013

Dean Slinker presented the 2013 Zoetis Award for Research to Doug Call, a professor of molecular epidemiology in the Paul G. Allen School for Global Animal Health. Dr. Call is a nationally recognized, award-winning scholar who has an active research program in food and water-borne diseases and salmonid aquaculture.

img3

2012

Dean Slinker and Jere Johnston (Zoetis) presented the 2012 Zoetis Award for Research to Katrina Mealey from the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences for her ongoing research in companion animal pharmacogenetics.

konkel

2011

Dean Slinker presented the 2011 Zoetis Award for Research to Michael Konkel from the School of Molecular Biosciences for his ongoing research on the pathogenesis and pre-harvest food safety with Campylobacter jejuni.

brayton

2010

Dean Slinker presented the 2010 Zoetis Award for Research to Dr. Kelly Brayton from the Department of Veterinary Microbiology & Pathology. Dr. Brayton has been a leader in the infection biology of the tick-borne pathogen Anaplasma marginale.

2009PfizerResearch

2009

Dean Slinker presented the 2009 Zoetis Award for Research to Dr. David Rector from the Department of Veterinary and Comparative Anatomy, Pharmacology, and Physiology. Dr. Rector has been a leader in developing novel approaches for collecting brain cell activity with minimally invasive techniques.  He has applied these techniques to further the understanding of cortical states during sleep and wake, and in the function of the somatosensory cortex.

Meurs

2008

Dr. Meurs received 2008 Zoetis award for her outstanding research contributions in familial cardiac disease, particularly cardiomyopathies.

besse-edit

2007

Dr. Besser was introduced by David Prieur and presented the Zoetis Award for Research Excellence plaque and check by Warwick Bayly on October 17, 2007. Jere Johnston of Zoetis attended the banquet.

Dr. Besser was recognized for his long-term studies on the microbiology, epidemiology, and ecology of bacteria important in human food safety with an emphasis on E. coli, multi-drug resistant Salmonella enterica, and Campylobacter. He has had a very productive and well-extramurally funded research program in his 17 years as a faculty member. He has a dual appointment in the Washington Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory and the Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Pathology and heads the NIH-funded Zoonosis Research Unit. He is a collaborative scientist and has published in concert with his collaborators over 130 scientific publications in high quality refereed journals.

Granzier-edit

2006

The College of Veterinary Medicine Research Committee has selected Dr. Henk Granzier as this years recipient of the Zoetis Research Award. Dr. Granzier is a faculty member of Integrative Physiology and Neuroscience (IPN). Dr. Granziers leadership and collaboration with colleagues and other laboratories has resulted in a better understanding of muscle function from the molecular level through actual force and movement.

Fox

2005

The College of Veterinary Medicine Research Committee has selected Dr. Larry Fox of the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences as this year’s recipient of this year’s Zoetis Research Award for advancing understanding of mastitis. The award was presented at the banquet following the 7th CVM Student Research Symposium held on October 20, 2005.

HinesResearchEdit

2004

The College of Veterinary Medicine Research Committee has named Dr. Steve Hines recipient of the 2004 Zoetis Award for Research Excellence for his research on hemoparasites, and more recently, the neonatal immune response of foals to Rhodococcus equi.


2003

The College of Veterinary Medicine Research Committee has named Dr. Jim Krueger recipient of the 2003 Zoetis Award for Research Excellence. The award was presented at CVM Student Research Symposium banquet, October 9, 2003.

Clive Gay

2002

Dr. Clive Gay, through his leadership of the College's Field Disease Investigation Unit has provided solutions for many important diseases of livestock. These solutions are the result of Dr. Gay's efforts in connecting on farm disease investigations with the research laboratory.

Washington State University